New Testing Tool – Binoculars

A few days ago I met my good friend Phill Isles for coffee to plan an upcoming workshop centered around testing IOT devices.

Phill is quite interested in electronics and at the end of our meeting he handed me a small circuit board with what looked like half a small golf ball on one side (something like an icosahedron).  It turns out to be an PIR motion sensor (Passive InfraRed sensor). He recently bought 5 and thought I could have some fun with one (Thanks Phill). And all for only 80 pence each including shipping.

Later he sent me a link to the adafruit website with a tutorial for the PIR sensor.

PIR motion sensor connected to Raspberry Pi

PIR motion sensor connected to Raspberry Pi

I wired the PIR sensor into my Raspberry Pi, then slightly modified the example program to print a ‘Movement Detected‘ message on the screen. And then started to test the sensitivity of the device.

As I moved away from the desk I could see the ‘Movement Detected‘ messages being displayed on the screen. But when I got 15 feet away I could no longer read the screen. Had a message been displayed? It was hard to tell.

How can I test the range? I was on my own with no-one to help. 2 minutes later I had a pair of binoculars to view the screen and all was well again.

It was the first time I have ever used binoculars for testing software. And a new tool was added to my software testing kit-bag.

Nikon Binoculars

Nikon Binoculars